Annual report 2017

  • ahdaa
  • October 10, 2018
  1. Social, Political and Economic Framework Conditions in the Reporting Period
    1.1 In the country and in the region
    1.1.1 Within the country in General: 

    Context:
    Afghanistan is a landlocked country of 634,790 sq.km. bounded to the West by Iran, to the South and the East by Pakistan and to the North by Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan. It also has small border with Peoples Republic of China in the far North East. The geography of Afghanistan is dominated by mountains. The Hindu Kush sweeps down from the north east through the central regions of the country and flattens out into the deserts of the southwest plateau. On either side of these mountains, to the North, and to the East, the land is more fertile, and it is in these areas that most agricultural activity takes place. This mountain range has also divided Afghanistan in three very different geographic regions known as; The Central Highlands, The Northern Plains, and the Southwestern Plateau. The altitude, climate, and soil conditions in Afghanistan varies greatly. The identification and delimitation of agro-ecological zones in Afghanistan is rather difficult. The country has a very varied geography, with thousands of microclimates and micro watersheds, and frequently conditions change from one valley to the next, within a fairly short distance. Land atlas shows that out of 634,790 sq.km total land cover of the country 5.53% is irrigated agriculture land, 5.58% rain-fed agricultural land, 0.53% fruit and vineyards, 46.84% is rangeland, 27.16% barren land, 7.4% sand cover and 3% is water body, marshland and permanent snow

Afghanistan is considered as a country prone to a number of natural disasters: earthquakes, flooding, drought, landslides, and avalanches.  Earthquakes are relatively frequent, being more frequent in the north and northeast, and often trigger landslides.  Floods are common in the spring when snow begins to melt and rainfall is heavy.
Afghanistan is located in a zone of high-seismic activity. Given the rugged and mountainous nature of the country and the location of villages, towns and cities, there is always a high propensity for widespread death and destruction whenever an earthquake, landslide, mudslide, avalanche, or flooding occurs.
Decades of War and civil conflict, as well as environmental degradation, have all contributed to increasing vulnerability of the Afghan people to natural disasters. Several assessments by the humanitarian agencies have revealed significant shortcomings in the areas of water, sanitation, health, security and natural resource management. Furthermore, the high level of poverty, lack of livelihood and income generating opportunities, chronic health problems, and poor state of the infrastructure all add to the burden of natural disasters on the people of Afghanistan.
In addition, the withdrawal of international troops as well as significant decrease to the financial contribution of international communities toward development of Afghanistan resulted to a more stressful situation for the people in Afghanistan. There is high level of economic challenges among the people in Afghanistan where they prioritize mainly their food rather other aspects of their life (i.e. health, education etc.).
Though it is not possible to completely avoid natural disasters, but the sufferings can be minimized by creating proper awareness of the likely disasters and its impact by developing a suitable warning system, disaster preparedness and management of disasters through application of information technology tools.
Natural Disasters cut across many boundaries, including organizational, political, geographic, professional, topical, and sociological. This means that disaster information needs to be disseminated to all stakeholders at Shura, District, Provincial and National levels, both public and private.

b. Overall security situation:
The overall security situation in Afghanistan remains unstable. Multiple attacks have happened in Afghanistan. Situation in Kabul remains quite challenging where few heavy attaches have happened during implementation of project which resulted to the dead and injury of hundreds of people. Recently rocket attacks happened in airport in Kabul which raised further stress to the population, and some suicide attacks happened in mosques in Kabul and Herat provinces which were mostly targeting the Shia religion groups.
During 2017, there were multiple attacks on different provinces of Afghanistan especially on Kunduz which was about to be fully dropped under Taliban control few times. At present most of the districts in different provinces are under Taliban control and the ring road is quite unsafe. Taliban and Islamic state groups has influence to over 60% of the country which result to high depression of wider community members about their future especially the children.
Over all security situation is unstable in most of province where the opposition groups have influence over 60% of the country travel by road between the provinces is quite challenging by the normal population
The biggest security evolution across the country is the recent decision of US to send more military troops in Afghanistan to support the national security forces. This decision was highly appreciated by the Afghan government, parliament and wider population of the country although people are still lost between hope and fear

1.1.2 Overview of Central region:
Central region of Afghanistan is one of the largest regions of the country consist of province of Kabul, Parwan, Maidan Wardak, Sari Pul, Bamyan and Daykundi where these provinces are located around Kabul as a circle. Most of the central provinces are located in mountain areas. Different categories of population living in central region which includes Tajik, Uzbak, Hazara, Turkaman etc… the average of ethnic groups are vary from one to another province. Most of the people living in these provinces especially in Kabul consist of whom who work for the government as civil servant.
Most of the income generation activities in central provinces include agriculture, handicraft, Gardening and livestock. Most of these productions are consumed internally within the mentioned provinces while limited part of their production is reaching to national market.
Considering the fact that most of the provinces under central region are located in mountain areas, they are vulnerable to different types of natural disasters (ex. Flood, earthquake, avalanche and partially drought.
As other parts of the country, people in central region are suffering from health, education, agriculture etc… problems.
Security situation in central region significantly changed since last year where Kabul as the capital of Afghanistan experienced huge increase to the number of attacks comparing to last one or two years. Over last quarter of 2017, a severe rocket attack has happened in Kabul airport while. Media, diplomatic places, UN and international organization is not anymore safe as they are considered as a target by the Taliban and Islamic State (IS).

Overview of Daykundi:
Daykundi, is one of the thirty-four provinces of Afghanistan, located in the central part of the country. It has a population of about 723,980 (51%men and 49% women) which is a Hazara Province. Daykundi  consist of 7 districts including Ashtarlay, Kijran, Khedir, Kitti, Mirmor, Nilli, Sang Takht and Sharistan districts. The population of Daykundi consists of multi-ethnic and mostly a rural tribal society. The ethnic Hazaras make up 86% of the total population of the province followed by Pashtuns at 8.5%, Balochs 3.5% and Sayyids 2%. All the inhabitants follow Islam, with Shi’as the majority and Sunnis as the minority. Languages spoken in the province include Dari, Hazaragi, Pashto, and Balochi.
Daykundi is located in central highland region of Afghanistan and is bordered with Ghazni to the east, Uruzgan to the south, Helmand to the south west, Ghor to the south west and north and Bamyan to the north east. The province covers an area of 16.655km2. Almost the whole province (96.6%) is mountainous or semi mountainous terrain while only 2.6% of the area is made up of flat or semi flat land. About 99% of the population lives in rural areas.
Since the establishment of the province nearly a decade ago, the province has extended its security having the best of all provinces and has increased education surpassing even Kabul in the number of those passing university entrance exams. The province, began its transition in December 2011, maintains its own security through the Afghan police and military.
As per central statistic organization (2014) half of the population of Daykundi was aged 15 years or younger, implying a young population in the province. The 5–9 years age group constituted the largest segment of the provincial population at 17.8 percent, followed by those younger than 5 years at 15.9 percent and the 10–14 year age group at 15.7percent. The youth’s population (aged 15‐24 years) comprised 20.6 percent of the province’s population, of which 52.5 percent were males and 47.5 percent were females. This leads to a dependency ratio of 109 persons younger than 15 and older than 64 years for every 100 persons aged 15–64 years.
The literacy rate of the provincial population aged 10 years or older is 43.6 percent. The males’ literacy rate is 54.4 percent, while that of females’ is 32.2 percent. The youth’s (population aged 15 to 24 years old) literacy rate is 57.3 percent (67.2 percent for males and 46.5 percent for females), much higher than the national youth’s literacy rate at 47 percent (61.9 percent for males and 32.1 percent for females).
In Sang‐e‐Takht District, 25.4 percent has access to an improved drinking water source followed by Nili with 24.6 percent and Shahristan District with 13.2 percent. In Kejran District, almost all households (92.1 percent) do not have access to improved drinking water source (46.8 percent, unprotected well; 29.1 percent, unprotected spring; 15.6 percent, surface water; and 8.5 percent, others). [1]



Food Security and Agriculture:
Daykundi is ranked as “high risk”2 due to acute food insecurity in winter and spring lean seasons and the populations’ vulnerability to shocks. 2.5 percent (9,716 people) are very severely food insecure and 20.9 percent (81,686 people) are food insecure. According to the 2013 IPC analysis report, 18.4 per cent of the population (75,587 individual) experience “crisis” food situation and 17.3 percent (71,068 individual) people live under “emergency”. The continuation of dryness will exacerbate the already food insecure areas of Sangi Takht and Ishtarlay districts.  There is significant annual deficit of wheat due to lack of arable lands.

Health:
Daykundi is highly vulnerable to negative health impacts due to the poor performance and coverage of the public health system, compounded by scattered population, harsh terrain, extreme weather and recurrent natural disasters. Difficult or no accessibility is a reason of very high vulnerability for 30-39[3] per cent of the population in Khadir, Gizab, Sangi Takht, Ishtarlay, Gaiti and Kajran districts. Low vaccination coverage is the cause of high vulnerabilities for 74.6% of population in Ishtarlay, Khadir, Gizab, Sangi Takht, Nili and Gaiti districts. Shahristan, Nili, Miramor and Ishtarlay districts recorded the highest number of diseases outbreaks in Daykundi.

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene:
Daykundi is a high ranking WASH province and is prone to drought and flash floods. Cluster presence and access to the province is limited. Access to safe drinking water index is very high with low availability of water point per families and is a cause of high vulnerability to water related diseases.
More than half (50.5 percent) of the households in Daykundi Province are using the elevated type of toilet facility in which dirt is deposited on the ground and collected every now and then.  Two in three (66.1 percent) households in Nili used this type of toilet. Two in five households (41.1 percent) reported to have no toilet facility (or just using field or bush) in the province. Among the districts, more than half of the households in Keti (70.2 percent) and Kejran (57.7 percent) Districts also reported having no toilet facility. Only 1.8 percent of the households in the province reported having an improved sanitation facility (flush or pour flush to sewer system, septic tank, or to pit; ventilated improved pit latrine; pit latrine with slab; or composting toilet), a rate much lower than the national average of 8.3 percent[4].

 Sang Takht Bandar district:
Sang Takht Bandr is one of the big districts of Daykundi  having 270km2 land (as per information from district governmental department) and has a total of 324 villages. As per information from AIRD, 59.3% mountainous, 28.2% semi mountainous, 4.8% flat areas, 5.9% semi flat areas. As per report from central statistics on (1391 or 2012) Sang Takht Bandar has 86440 people population. There are 14 governmental departments active in this district where a total of 28 staff are working in these departments.

Security in Sang Takht Bandar:
Security in this district is fine where the is no existence of opposition groups (Taliban and Islamic State), no risk of kidnapping or terror attacks, government has full access to the communities and have full control of security in this district. There is also another fact that people in this district are from the same ethnic group (All Hazara people) and they keep their unity where the chance for influence of opposition groups are very limited and or even impossible in this area. There are different political parties functional in all Daykundi  as well as in Sang Takht where these parties do not have negative influence to the security situation in Sang Takht due to the fact that they have their specific agenda for taking governmental positions and some parties are recently involved in absorption of human resources for the Islamic State in Syria but this action did not have any impact on security situation of the district so far.
Due to above mentioned reasons, there is high possibility for NGOs to conduct their activities in safe environment. Government and wider community members are supportive toward ensuring security of the organizations working in this district. There are a total of 600KM length of streets without asphalt and raising difficult movement for the people. However, the risk of thief and robbery exist where AHDAA experienced a robbery incident in its office in Sang-Takht Bandar district during 2016 and big part of office equipment (i.e. camera, computers, GPS machine, mobile phones and some cash) has been stolen but after investigation by the governmental departments, we realized that this was one of the exceptional cases happened in this district.

Education in Sang Takht Bandar:
A total of 41 primary schools (only up to 3rd class) are active in this district including 37 mixed for male and female and 4 schools only for female students. Total of 8 secondary schools (up to 6th class) including 6 mixed and 2 female schools, 14 intermediate schools (up to 9th class) all mixed girls and boys and finally there are 19 high schools (up to 12th class) including 17 mixed for girls and boys and 2 only for girls. In total 15402 students including 8283 male and 7119 female are studying in these schools. 385 teachers including 223 male and 162 female. Out of the entire schools, only 8 schools are equipped with buildings.

Health in Sang Takht Bandar:
Life expectancy is reported 65 year in this district and mortality rate is 5% for adult and 6% for children. Pregnancy rate for the women is 6 children per women. 30% of the children got vaccination. Only 30% of the population has access to health services in this district.
The main diseases in this district include pneumonia, Tuberculosis, diarrhea, measles. In total 2 comprehensive health centers, 31 health posts and 8 pharmacies exist in this district. Maximum distance to the clinics from district center is 45km. There are no doctors in this district while the health services are mainly provided by the med-level workers.

Agriculture and livestock in Sang Takht Bandar:
85% of the population in this district earns income from agriculture and livestock and agriculture. There are a total of 104790 Jirib (1 Jirib = 2000m2 or in another word 5 Jiribs = 1 hectare) land in this district which shows and average of 2 Jirib land per family in this district. In total 15790 Jirib lands are accessed to water and 89000 Jirib lands are not accessed to water. No agriculture and livestock cooperation exist in this district. Around 80% of the population lives under poverty line, a total of 1000 women are the head of household and finally there are a total of 1800 persons with disabilities in this district.

Food security in Sang Takht:
Sang Takht is locked by the mountains but has some reasonable lands for agriculture as well as with existence of springs around the villages but most of these springs are not well utilized for irrigation and for agriculture work. AHDAA Needs and Risk Assessment (Oct 26-Nov 9, 2017) shows that the seasonal floods, droughts, harsh winters, heavy snow, avalanches, and animal/agriculture diseases had significant impact to the agriculture work of this district which raised huge food security challenges for community members living in this district.
The average of land ownership among the people is 0.8 Jirib per person and the average of livestock is 10.6 sheep/goats and 2 cows per person. The average of income per family is 12000 AFS (180 USD) per year which is significantly low to secure the food for people. Most of the community members use only wheat and in spring season use some animal products (milk and yogurt) as their food which does not provide the adequate energy for healthy body. Most of the people has access to basic food around 4-6 months in a year while rest of the 6-8 months, they have very limited access to their nutritional needs.

  1. Changes during the project period:
    1.1 Organisational changes

The following organizational changes have been done within AHDAA over 2017:

  • AHDAA started a new project in Badghis funded by CAID. This project is focusing on Tackling violence and Building peace as well as prevention of GBV through involvement of women in decision making processes of the communities.
  • AHDAA submitted its papers to UNOCHA to be registered under CHF (Common Humanitarian Funding). We are expecting to pass their minimum requirements to be registered in this program.
  • AHDAA moved its sub office from Dorop village to Sulbito village which is located in Sang-Takht Bandar district of Daykundi .
  • One of the great movement of AHDAA over 2017 was that an in depth SWOT analysis was done for the organization where we found our strengths and gaps for further improvement of the organizational function. The result of this analysis were shared with entire managerial and technical team of AHDAA through a workshop and agreed on action points for further development.

    1.2 Operational changes

It was initially planned to rehabilitate the existing spring in Sorkhak village and construct a water pool for irrigation purposes but due to the fact that the level of spring water has significantly decreased which was not anymore sufficient for irrigation, community members suggested digging a deep well instead of spring. After technical assessment of AHDAA, the option for dig well was identified as a more relevant alternative in Sorkhak community and after relevant communication with DkH and district departments it was decided to change this activity. Further details about this change has been elaborated under a separate document shared with DKH
AHDAA Finance Manager Mr. Omid Ahmad Fayez leaved AHDAA to seek asylum in US and after interviewing process as per organizational human resource policy, he has been replaced by Mr. Shafiq Ahmad Eltaf as the new Finance Manager.

        1.3Cooperation with other organisations and aid agencies

The entire project activities were closely coordinated with related stakeholders in targeted communities. At the beginning of the project, AHDAA conducted coordination meeting with Shura structures and key community members in targeted communities. In this meeting detailed information about project has been shared with Shura members as well as the contribution of AHDAA and Shura structures has been discussed and agreed toward implementation and sustainability of the project.
AHDAA maintained close contact with Economic, RRD, education and ANDMA Departments of Daykundi  province. Also we had close coordination with district authority’s sectorial department, District CDC in Sang Takht Bandar district of Daykundi  province for implementation in the target area. And also, AHDAA actively participated in cluster meetings in Daykundi .
At Herat level, AHDAA continued its close coordination with national and international organizations through its active participation in in different cluster meetings (i.e. WASH, agriculture, FSAC and child protection)
          1.4 Inputs utilized for project implementation, including staff, funds, goods, transportation, equipment and tools, and list of capital assets, explaining future use after project closure
The following items purchased during the course of the project:

  • 2 laptop computer purchased
  • 5 Gas heaters

For further details, please refer to the financial report.

1) Establishment of sub office in Salbito village
Due to the fact that the sub office of AHDAA was located in an unsecure location, AHDAA decided to change its sub office and thus, on 3rd April 2017, AHDAA established its sub office in Salbito village, the center of Sang Takht Bandar District. The sub office is located in nearby to the police station which is the most secure location of district and also located in the most accessible area. The sub office consists of enough space for the work for all staff of AHDAA.

2) Coordination with strategic project stakeholders in DRR and education at provincial and district levels.
AHDAA actively participated in stakeholder’s forums and ensured proper coordination with relevant governmental and nongovernmental partners in Sang-Takht Bandar district of Daykundi  as well as at provincial level. As a summary, the following coordination activities were carried out during the course of this project:

  • Official registration of the project in Economy department was done and the entire relevant project documents have been shared with relevant governmental departments at district and provincial levels.
  • An orientation session has been conducted with relevant district departments participated by district governor, representative from national security department, head of police and Shura members (total 8 people). The session was chaired by Eng. Abdul Aziz Sarwary – Executive director for AHDAA. During this session, the entire project details (including its objectives, results and activities, project location etc…) have been shared with participants and also the AHDAA team emphasized on the role of governmental departments and Shura structures during implementation and monitoring of the project activities. This productive session provided the opportunity for AHDAA to ensure full governmental and Shura participation in support (mainly on community participation to contribute free labours to the project’s work) and monitoring from the project’s progress and contributed to a better quality of project activities.
  • During May 28th, 29th and 30th 2017, 4 coordination meetings were conducted with Shura members and key community members from these villages. The meeting focused on introduction of the team and Shura members to each other, defining the roles and responsibilities of the communities and AHDAA toward project implementation, establishing the working groups for DRR activities, agreeing on a space for stock to store the construction materials (stock was contributed by community members), agreeing on project plan and finally, signing guarantee letters by the Shuras to ensure security of AHDAA staff and materials, Facilitation of training hall by the communities, method and criteria for selection of CBDRM and task force group members, community contribution and participation for implementation all project activates
  • AHDAA team participated in Provincial Disaster Committee (PDC) meetings in Nilli centre of Daikundi province. The idea of this meeting was to ensure coordination among different NGOs implementing projects as well as ensure government is aware of all provincial development activities.

In addition to above mentioned coordination activities, AHDAA continued maintaining its close participation to different coordination forums in Herat province in order to stay informed about the challenges and developments in regards to WASH, DRR and other protection matters. More specifically, AHDAA actively participated to the following forums:

  • FSAC coordination meetings
  • WASH cluster meetings
  • Protection cluster
  • PDC-DRR coordination meetings
  • ACBAR meetings
  • INSO security meetingsa. Other meetings part of NGOsStaff recruitment
    During the reporting period, according to AHDAA, HR policy and employment procedure, in consideration of budget, the following staffs have been recruited for the project:

    Name of staff Number Position Duration Month %

    Administrative staff

    Eng. Abdul Aziz Sarwari 1 Director 8 month 14%
    Omid Ahmad Fayez 1 Finance Manager 8 month 18%
    Fatema Ebrahimi 1 Accountant 8 month 20%
    Dr. Farhad Faqhiri 1 Admin Manager 8 month 18%
    Abdul Sattar karimi 1 Logistic Manager 8 month 18%

    Project Personnel

    Eng. Moh. Yosuf Etamad 1 Project Manager 8 month 100%
    Said Abdul Wase Sadat 1 Admin/Finance Officer 8 month 100%
    Omid Gul 1 Project engineer 8 month 100%
    Faridoon Barekzai 1 Agronomist/veterinary 4 month 100%
    Abdullah 1 Community Moblizer/ Health educator male 8 month 100%
    Amiro Esar 1 Community Moblizer/ Health educator female 8 month 100%
    Safder Ali 1 Foreman 7 month 100%
    Khodadad 1 Guard/Cook 8 month 100%
    Ali Akbar 1 Guard 8 month 100%

4) Purchasing/procurement and logistics

Hiring a vehicle for staff transportation:
In line with procurement policy of AHDAA and with consideration of available budget for the project, one FalandCoach car has been rented for 11 months’ period to support the staff movements in the project field.

Procurement of office equipment:
In line with procurement policy of AHDAA and in consideration of available budget, AHDAA purchased the entire needs for office equipment in Daykundi . In total, 234807 AFN equipment have been purchased while 106077 AFN have been covered by the project and 128730 AFN amount have been covered by AHDAA. The entire equipment has been included in stock list of AHDAA. Further details about the type of equipment have been reflected in financial report

NO Item Unit Quantity Used status
A Equipment for construction
1 Shovel no 40
2 Picks no 40
3 Wheelbarrow no 8
4 Gloves paier 20
5 Cup no 30
6 Hand shavel no 10
7 Hand pickas no 10
8 Air   pump no 1
9 Mask no 30
10 Tier wheelbarrow no 5
11 iron saw no 5
12 Eye glass no 20
13 Tulip no 5
14 Shoes pair 20
B Cement bag 1001
C Steel bar 12mm kg 3500
D Steel bar 6mm kg 80
E Steel bar1.5mm kg 150
F polyethylene pipe materials 31
G hygiene Toolkit 0 0
1 Shampoo no 336
2 Pasty no 336
3  tooth brush no 1008
4 Soap no 336
5 soap pat no 336
6 Finger nail no 336
7 Towel no 336
8 Pitcher no 336
H Stone M3 126
I Gravel& Sand M3 140
j DRR TOOlkit for School
1 Hacksaw no 1
2 Cup no 2
3 Eye glass no 2
4 Fire Extinguisher no 1
5 water  jerry can no 9
6 Rope kg 9
7 Malow no 10
8 Tent no 5
9 Plastic Path no 168
10 Iron  Chair no 5
11 Carpet meter 120
10 Melding wage M2 358
11 Steel work kg 5690
K Skill labour man/day 154
L Net for Gabion M2 170
M Stone for Gabion M3 16
N Latrine  equipment
1 sink latrine no 13
2 Door no 13
3 window 0.5*o.5 no 13
O DRR TOOlkit for community
1 wheel barrow no 5
2 Shovel no 10
3 Picks no 10
4 Jabal no 2
5 Gloves no 20
6 Rope meter 50
7 Handle Burma no 4
8 Cup no 4
9 Hacksaw no 4
10 Fire Extinguisher no 4
P Animal Husbandry Kit
1 Syringe 5cc automat no 5
2 Animal finger nail no 1
3 Burdizo no 5
4 knife& sheath no 5
q improved wheat seed and fertilizer
1 Wheat kg 750
2 DAP Bag/50kg 30
3 UREA Bag/50kg 30
R Vegetable seeds
1 Egg plant kg 5
2 Tomato can 8
3 Cucumber can 5
4 Okra kg 4
5 Squash gram 400
6 Lettuce kg 1
7 Basil kg 2
8 Cabbage gram 100
9 Sweet pepper gram 100
10 Bitter pepper kg 1
11 Carrot kg 4.5
12 Turnip kg 7.5
13 Spinach kg 22.5
14 Radish kg 9
15 Cress kg 9
16 Radish kg 9
1 Plumbing pipe pp M 8420
2  Zinc pipe M 53
S Drug treatment/Vaccination
1 Sheep pox ampol 25
2 FMD Turkey ampol 10
3 Etv jovac ampol 40
4 Kepromec ampol 15
5 Antibiotic talyzon botel 25
6 Oxytetracyclin botel 25
7 Vit AD3E botel 25
8 Syrop becomplex botel 20
9 soryng Vaccinator 5cc automatic no 1
10 needle soryng Doze 1
11 Boe powder(DCP) kg 100
12 Tablet albendazole 650 mg pack 100
13 Ditribution   DRR Training soap 1200
T Office Equipment
1 Still chair no 5
2 Desk no 1
3 Picnic Gas no 2
4 Capsol Gas no 9
5 Stove no 5
U Construction  Materials
1 polyetheline pipe 3 inch M 2230
2 polyetheline pipe 2 inch M 3400
3 polyetheline pipe 1inch M 200
4 polyetheline pipe0.5 inch M 520
5 Ashtat 2 inch unit 18
6 Ashtat 3 inch unit 9
7 Elb0w 0.5 inch zinc unit 20
8 Elb0w 2inch unit 2
9 Elb0w 3 inch unit 4
10 Fitting 0.5 inch unit 20
11 Fitting 2 inch unit 4
12 Fitting 3 inch unit 4
13 Link 0.5 inch unit 10
14 Link 2 inch unit 35
15 Link 3 inch unit 33
16 polica pipe 3 inch M 39
17 polica pipe 4 inch M 44
18 Same zinc 0.5 inch unit 10
19 Same zinc 2 inch unit 12
20 Same zinc 3 inch unit 9
21 Tap 0.5 inch unit 10
22 Teflon Tape unit 70
23 three contact 0.5 inch unit 5
24 three contact 2 inch unit 6
25 Valve 2 inch unit 3
26 Valve 3  inch unit 7
27 zinc pipe o.5 inch M 20
28 zinc pipe 1 inch M 3
29 zinch pipe 2 inch M 18
30 zinch pipe 3 inch M 9
31 fitting polica pipe M 81

 

 

The following materials were provided during project implementation

No Items Quantity Purpose of Use Status Remarks
1 DRR and Hygiene promotion manual 1200 chapter For CBDRM committees and task force groups, teachers and students of targeted High schools Utilized
2 DRR Toolkit 21 kit To be used in Disaster risk reduction Utilized 19 distributed in three target villages and tow distributed in drop high schools
3 Hygiene toolkit 400 kit For observing better hygiene and sanitation and change in their live habit Utilized

 

 

All the Above items are registered in DKH project inventory which is maintaining and updating by AHDAA logistic officer and as per AHDAA stock management procedure, items were sent to community.

Project Activities Implemented
3.1 Project activities implemented, and results achieved during entire project period:

Expected result 1:
The 4 targeted communities are more avalanche, flood and drought resilient through enhanced coping mechanisms by means of establishment of CBDRM committees and task force groups as well as awareness raising at community and school levels

Activity 1.1: Formation of 4 CBDRM committees (including male and female members in each committee) in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak under Saai valley
Status: 100% achieved.
At the beginning of the project, AHDAA conducted an orientation meeting with key community members (i.e. Shura members, CDC members, women and other community elders), to discuss on establishment of CBDRM committees in targeted communities. In total 4 meetings were conducted in 4 targeted communities (Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak) and as the result, 4 CBDRM committees have been established. The entire committee members consist of 21 members including (12male and 9 female) including 6 members (4 men and 2 women) in Sorkhak, 5 members (3 male and 2 female) in Sharistan, 5 members including (3 male 2 female) Sabza Now and 5 member (3male 2 female) in Karak communities.

The following criteria have been considered for selection of CBDRM committee members which was defined in community meetings:

  • The members shall work as volunteers
  • The members shall be between 18 – 65
  • The member shall be respected by the community members
  • The members shall be diversified from different ethics of the communities

The entire 22 selected CBDRM committee members ensured their full commitment to support DRR activities. All CBDRM committees were officially registered at district level.

Activity 1.2: Formation of one CBDRM committee in Istaqlal high school under Saai valley
Status: 100% achieved.

In close coordination with school’s teachers and students, one CBDRM committee has been officially established on June 21, 2017 in Istaglal high school located in Seya Khark bazar under Saii valley. The committee consists of 12 members including 6 males, 6 females (3 teachers, 3 male students and 6 female students. The entire committee members received orientation session (2 hours) on the role and responsibilities of the committee. The committee members expressed their full commitment toward mitigation activities during, before and after disasters in their respected school. Over the course of project implementation, the committee members from schools had shown quite active involvement in regards to preparedness toward DRR interventions i.e. full participation in trainings, they have done few role play after the training to put their learning into practice and encouraging other community members to support disaster issues.

Activity 1.3: Formation of 16 Task Force groups in targeted villages under Saai valley (4 groups per village)

In consideration of the methodologies and approaches described under activity 1.1 of this report, AHDAA supported the community members in 4 targeted communities to establish 16 task force groups (4 groups per community).

The following groups have been established in each of the targeted communities:

  • First aid group
  • Shelter Management group
  • Search & rescue Group
  • Early warning group

In total 66 people including 38 men and 28 women have selected as task force group member. In addition, one first aid group has been established in Istaghlal high school (2 men and 2 women) including 2 teacher and 2 student. Below table shows detailed information about task force groups:
Status: 100% achieved.

In consideration of the methodologies and approaches described under activity 1.1 of this report, AHDAA supported the community members in 4 targeted communities to establish 16 task force groups (4 groups per community).
The following groups have been established in each of the targeted communities:

  • First aid group
  • Shelter Management group
  • Search & rescue Group
  • Early warning group

In total 66 people including 38 men and 28 women have selected as task force group member. In addition, one first aid group has been established in Istaghlal high school (2 men and 2 women) including 2 teacher and 2 student. Below table shows detailed information about task force groups:

No Name of village First Aid Group Shelter Management group Search & rescue  Group Early warning group Total
Village Male Fem Male Fem Male Fem Male Fem
1 Sorkhak 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 24
2 Sharistan 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 16
3 Sabza Now 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 12
4 Karak 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 12
Total 9 7 9 7 9 7 9 7 64

 

The main role of these task forces groups are to be prepared before, during and after disaster events in order to provide the relevant supportive actions for the community members who are at the risk of disasters. Indeed, they are expected to be the active players of disaster response’s cycles (including non-disaster doing preparedness actions, before disaster doing preparedness and early warning plus coordination and during disaster doing response and recovery actions and finally, after disaster doing prevention and rehabilitation actions). The selected group members shown their commitment through their active participation in the trainings as well as doing role play after the course.

Activity 1.4: Training for CBDRM committees and task force groups
Status: 100% achieved.

During the project period, AHDAA organized the entire trainings that were planned as per initial plan of the project. The following trainings were organized during the course of this project:
21 CBDRM committee members (12 males and 9 female) received 5 days training on DRR and advocacy skills (3 days on DRR and 2 days on advocacy skills). In addition, based on the request from communities, AHDAA conducted 2 days training on conflict resolution. This request for conflict resolution training came to AHDAA when CBDRM committee members received information from Dyar Miana and Sarqul villages during their exposure visit who said that the conflict resolution training was useful to solve their internal conflicts. These trainings were conducted by Eng. M. Yosuf Etamad with support from community mobilizers. The trainings were covered by the following topics:

DRR training:

  • Principles of disaster risk reduction
  • Types of Hazard in Afghanistan
  • Type of hazards in Daykundi with more specific focus on Sang Takht district specially Drop Valley
  • Information about flood, Drought and impact
  • Evacuation plan (Practice)
  • Role and responsibility of CBDRM committees and task force groups in tacking action on non-disaster, before disaster, during disaster and after disaster for reducing risk,
  • Case studies, After Disaster scenario, loss of lives and properties related

The comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 67% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 14% knowledge about DRR before the course and 81% at the end of the course.
Advocacy skills training:

  • Definition of advocacy
  • Objectives of advocacy
  • What can be advocated?
  • How can be advocated?
  • Who can be targeted for advocacy at community, district, provincial and national level
  • Who can take part in advocacy activities
  • How to manage advocacy activitiesThe comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 61% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 18% knowledge about advocacy before the course and 79% at the end of the course.
    Conflict resolution training:

    • Definition of conflict
    • Sources of the conflict
    • Role of communication in conflict resolution
    • Distinguish between conflict and fire and how it raised and controlled
    • How a conflict can be controlled
    • Role of people having key role in making conflict
    • How to resolve a conflictThe comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 71% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 21% knowledge about conflict resolution before the course and 92% at the end of the course.
      15 first aid group members (9 men and 7 women) received 4 days training on First Aid. The training focused on:

      • What is first aid?
      • Role of first aid groups during and after disaster
      • Referral and follow up system
      • Specific technical skills required for an emergency response for a first aid worker
      • How to prioritize patients during a disaster

      The comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 70% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 19% knowledge about first aid before the course and 89% at the end of the course.

      16 members of shelter management groups received 2 days training on shelter management focusing on the following topics:

      • What is the role of task force groups in shelter management?
      • To ensure they have a specific secured address as referent point for people to visit during disaster. (Ensuring separate space for variety of groups including male, female, children, injured etc…). And also, the shelter should be accessible with water, food, toilets etc…
      • How and where to manage the shelters
      • How to facilitate and maintain food and other basic needs
      • And also, how to advice community members toward construction of their new houses to ensure those are not constructed in hazard areas.

      The comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 65% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 27% knowledge about DRR before the course and 92% at the end of the course.
      16 search and rescue group members received 2 days training on search and rescue focusing on the following topics:

      • Definition of search and rescue
      • Role of task groups in search and rescue (during non-disaster, pre disaster, during disaster and after disaster)
      • The theoretical and practical specific skills that a search and rescue member shall have (during non-disaster, pre disaster, during disaster and after disaster)The comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 73% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 13% knowledge about search and rescue before the course and 86% at the end of the course.
        16 early warning group members received 2 days training on early warning focusing on the following topics:

        • Definition of early warning system
        • Communication of early warning system
        • Methods of early warning system
        • Frequency of early warning system (during non-disaster, pre disaster, during disaster and after disaster)The comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 61% improvement to the knowledge of participants. They initially expressed 19% knowledge about DRR before the course and 80% at the end of the course.
          And finally, AHDAA in close coordination with CBDRM committee members and Shura structures developed DRR contingency plan for each of the targeted communities. The community action  plans have been properly oriented for the community members where all committee members expressed their fully preparedness to activated the contingency plan whenever needed. (Annex 1. community action plan)Activity 1.5: Training on DRR for school’s teachers and students
          Status: 100% achieved.In close coordination with education department and school’s management team, 2 day’s trainings were conducted for the teachers and students at Istaqlal high school and a total of 13 teachers (9 men and 4 women), 1 male guard, 1 male store keeper, 1000 students (420 girls and 580 boys) participated in this course.
          The following topics were covered in these trainings:

          • Principles of disaster risk reduction
          • Types of hazard in Afghanistan
          • Types of hazards in Daykundi with more specific focus on Sang Takht district specially Drop Valley
          • Information about flood, drought and avalanches as well as these hazard’s impact
          • Develop evacuation plan (practice)
          • Role and responsibilities of teachers and students on taking actions on non-disaster, before disaster, during disaster and after disaster
          • Case studies, after disaster scenario loss of lives and properties related for school’s students

          The trainings were conducted by project manager and community mobilizers where all trainings took place in school. Participants were divided into groups of 30-40 people to join each session. DRR manuals were distributed to the entire participants of the training.

          Activity 1.6: Training on DRR for CDC members in Saai valley
          Status: 100% achieved.

          In close coordination with CDC structure in Sangi-Takht Bandar district, 2 days DRR training was conducted for 30 CDC members (20 men and 10 women) during Aug 23-24. Training conducted by Project Manager and Mr. Aminulhaq Akhgar (DKH representative in Afghanistan). The training was conducted in AHDAA sub office which also raised opportunity for a better networking between AHDAA and CDC. The following topics were covered during this training:

          • Principles of disaster risk reduction
          • Identify natural and manmade disaster
          • Types of hazard in Sange takht Bandar
          • Information about flood, drought, and avalanche and their impact
          • Disaster Cycle Management (non-disaster, before disaster, during disaster and after disaster)
          • What is needs and risk assessments and how should we do it
          • What is village community profile?
          • What is village community mapping and how should we do it
          • What is seasonal calendar and how do we make this
          • History of risk and how we should do it
          • Natural disaster risk/natural disaster risk, destruction, solutions, ranking and responsibilities
          • Sectors and level of vulnerability in the village (high, medium, low)
          • Prioritization of problems based on 3 major risks
          • Roles and responsibilities CDC, Shura regarding DRR in district level or cluster and village

          The result of pre and post-test shows significant improvement to the level of understanding by the participants (around 60% improvement).

          Activity 1.7: Distribution of DRR materials (First aid boxes and DRR toolkits) for CBDRM and task force groups as well as teachers and students.
          Status: 100% achieved.

          After holding DRR trainings for the CBRM committee members and schools, 4 DRR toolkits distributed for the 4 CBDRM committees in 4 targeted communities and one DRR toolkit distributed for Istaqlal high school. DRR toolkits and first aid boxes for CBDRM committee members consist of: 1 axe, 20 meter rope, 1 hacksaw, 1 handle loud speaker, 1 shovel, 1 safety cap, 1 safety glasses, 1 fire extinguisher, 1 gloves, 1 sprayer (20 liter), 1 water flax, 1 doctor uniform, 1 first aid box, 1 medical mask, 1 torch and 1 handle Burma
          And the DRR toolkit and first aid box for Istaqlal school consist of: 5 tents, one axe, 50 meters rope, 1 hacksaw, 1 handle loud speakers, 1 shovel, 2 safety caps, 2 safety glasses, 1 fire extinguisher, 2 gloves, 5 water flax, 2 doctor’s uniforms, 5 first aid box, 2 medical masks, 2 torch, 1 metallic saw, 1 wall barrow, 10 pinchers, 4 box glasses, 10 carpets.
          Eng Etemad has explained the use of all these materials, when to use and how to maintain the toolkits. The toolkit has been registered as part of the school’s and CBDRM inventory where someone is responsible for its maintenance.

           

          Activity 1.8: Conduct exposure visit for 4 targeted communities in (Drop Valley)
          Status: 100% achieved.

          On Aug 19, 2017 a coordination meeting was conducted with the CDC, governmental sector, CBDRM committees and Shura members in presence of Project Manager and Mr. Aminulhaq Akhgar. In this meeting exposure visits were coordinated and agreed with the participants where all 4 targeted communities and governmental representatives expressed their full agreement to facilitate and join the exposure visits. As a result of the mentioned coordination meeting, exposure visit conducted by AHDAA with participation of 46 people (36 men and 10 women). The main defined objectives of the exposure were:

          • To share experiences among different communities as well as with CDC members.
          • To maintain coordination among different communities and CDC structures.
          • Promote the coping mechanism through sharing lesson learnt among communities working on DRR.

          The exposure visit followed a structured to where the key focuses were on:

          • To visit the construction activities done by AHDAA
          • To discuss the impact of training activities done by AHDAA
          • To see the result of DRR work in targeted villages
          • To see how sustainability of the work was maintained by the communities.
          • To see the impact of the project on community life
          • To discuss on community action and contingency plan and how it is implemented
          • To discuss on strengths and gaps of the project as well as to discuss on what could be done further through such projects
          • To discuss on key activities that can be replicated from one to another community.The exposure visit was allowing time for participants to discuss among each other as well as to conduct field visit to see the practical work done by AHDAA focusing on above mentioned elements. The exposure visit took place during Aug 22, 2017 for a full day.
            The final feedback of the participants at the end of exposure visit expressed that the entire work done by AHDAA was quite valid where almost the entire participants raised their interest to replicate similar work in their communities. It was quite interesting that the participants noticed the importance of community contribution on sustainable development of their communities.
            In addition, during the exposure visit community organize the official takeover of the project from AHDAA and took the full responsibility for maintenance of the that has been developed by AHDAA. During this event, community highly appreciated the work done by AHDAA and support of DKH and they expressed that they rarely experienced such sustainable developments in their communities as well as hoped for future support.
            At the end of the ceremony, an appreciation letter was granted for DKH and AHDAA from Head to Shura and other district authorities which was given to Mr. Aminulhaq Akhgar and Eng. M. Yosuf Etamad.Expected result 2:
            The water quality and water security situation has improved at community level through WASH awareness raising activities. Activity 2.1: Conduct pre KAP and post KAP survey in 4 selected communities.
            Status: 100% achieved.From July 5 to July 30, 2017 pre KAP survey was conducted with a total of 48 people including 32 male and 16 females by Mr. Faridoon Barekzai, Mr. Wase Sadat, Mr. Abdulla Sardari, Miss. Amero (Community mobilizers). Also Post KAP Survey was done from 5th December till 10th Jan 2018 by AHDAA team in 4 target villages.
            Pre and post KAP survey was conducted with the same target groups of participants which include:

            • 10 people (5 men and 5 women) from Karak
            • 42 people (21 men and 21 women) from Sorkhak
            • 25 people (12 men and 13 women) Sharistan
            • 24 people (12 men and 12 women) from Sabzanaw

            The target groups were chosen based on the population of the communities and a random selection was done where 3 every 5 families were selected for interview.

             Activity 2.2: Training for wider community members (including male and female) on how to prevent water borne diseases in 4 selected communities.
            Status: 100% achieved.

            During the period of July 14 up to Sep 30 – 2017, HDAA provided 14 sessions (around 20 -22 participant per session) of training for wider community member on hygiene promotion, water sanitation and water source management in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak (Training took place at village level). A total of 336 people including 168 males and 168 females.

            • In Sorkhak 72 male and 72 female total received training 144 participants.
            • In Sharistan 42 male and 42 female total received training 84 participants.
            • In Sabza Now 40 male and 40 female total received training 80 participants.
            • In Karak 14 male and 14 female total received training 28 participants.

            Each training session was conducted for a period of 9 hours conducted over 3 days (3 hours per day). And the following contents were covered during the training:

            • Personal hygiene
            • Community hygiene
            • Proper maintenance of water resources
            • Importance of latrines (at houses and communities
            • Different types of latrines
            • Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS)
            • CLTS mobilization process/steps
            • Social mapping
            • Role of people in community hygiene
            • Calculation of FAECES
            • Flow diagram
            • Community action plan

            Training was combined by theoretical and practical sessions which provided the space for better learning for participants. These trainings were conducted by the community mobilizers/health education. At the end of training, hygiene and water resource management manual distributed to the entire participants of the training.

            Activity 2.3: REFLECT Method training for wider community members including male and female.
            Status: 100% achieved.

            In close coordination with Shura structures and CBDRM committee members, a total of 336 (168 men and 168 women) participants were selected to join the reflect method training. Selection process was followed by below criteria:

            • The person to be from target communities
            • Interested to learn
            • Illiterate

            As a result, 7 courses established to conduct REFLECT method training. These courses include:

            • 2 courses in Sharistan for 84 people (42 men and 42 women)
            • One course in Karak for 28 people (14 men and 14 women)
            • 2 courses in Sabz Naw for 80 people (40 men and 40 women)
            • 2 courses in Sorkhak. for 144 people (72 men and 72 women)

            These courses were done for 4 months (3 hours each day) focused on legal awareness, literacy, peace and conflict resolution, election, women role in community, national identification, security, HIV awareness, family planning, and hygiene issues.
            Trainings are conducted by community mobilizers Mr Abdulla Sardary, Mr Hossain, Miss Aziza Qambary and Miss Abiba Rasouly who were equipped with courses related knowledge over the initial phases of this project. The training followed a structured schedule. The training took place from 15 Sep 2017 and finished in 15 Jan 2018
            Training stationaries including (pen, pencil, notebook and eraser) were provided by AHDAA to the entire participants.
            The comparison report between pre-test and post-test shows 69% improvement to the knowledge of participants.

             Activity 2.4: Distribution of hygiene toolkits in 4 targeted communities
            Status: 100% achieved.

            After implementation of hygiene training for 336 participants (168 men and 168 women), all participants received hygiene toolkits. Each toolkits consist of:

            • One shampoo,
            • One toothpaste,
            • 3 toothbrushes (for family)
            • One face soap,
            • One towel,
            • One nail cutters and
            • One pitcher will use in latrine.

            In addition, a total of 168 plastic bath has been distributed for 168 families in targeted communities. All families who received the public baths, they have been clearly briefed on proper use and maintenance of these baths. The post follows up of AHDAA shows that the entire participants used the public baths and they appreciated this generous support of DKH and AHDAA for their community which has positive impact on their health.

            Expected result 3:
            The 3 targeted communities are more resilient through rehabilitation of springs, construction of water reserves, establishment of pipe schemes and 4 communities have improved sanitation levels through construction of latrines.

            Activity 3.1: Rehabilitation of springs, construction of water reservoir and Installation of pipe schemes and taps in 3 targeted villages.
            Status: 100% achieved.

            During the project implementation period, the entire construction activities have been completed at the end of Oct 2017. The following construction and rehabilitation activities took place:

            • 5 springs in Sharistan with the volume of 20m3 have been constructed. The work was done by 10 skilled labour (paid by AHDAA) and 30 unskilled labour (contributed by community).
            • Installation of pipe scheme in Sharistan village for irrigation water in length of 3100m utilized by Polyaniline pipes (paid by AHDAA). The work was done by 620 unskilled workers (total digging of pipe scheme canal = 1116m3) contributed by the communities.
            • Construction of water pool in Sharistan for irrigation with the volume of 157.3m3. The work was done by utilizing 61.2m3. RCC done by 42 skilled workers (paid by AHDAA) and 246 unskilled workers (contributed by the communities).
            • 5 springs constructed in Karak village with the volume of 21m3 done by 11 skilled workers (paid by AHDAA) and 33 unskilled workers contributed by the communities.
            • Installation of pipe scheme in Karak village for drinking water in length of 2500m utilized by Polyaniline pipes (paid by AHDAA). The work was done by 416 unskilled workers (total digging of pipe scheme canal = 900m3) contributed by the communities.
            • Construction of water reservoir in Karak village with capacity of 10.8m3 water. The work was done by utilizing 11m3 RCC, 12 skilled labors (paid by AHDAA) and 94 unskilled workers (contributed by the communities).

            As justified in section 1.2 of this report, the activity for rehabilitation of spring in Sorkhak village has been changed to deep well and thus, as a result one deep well has been constructed in the mentioned village. The well is 53 meter deep and 24 solar panel with high quality stand by three solar panel frames installed. And also a 3 inches water pump has been installed and activated. A room has been constructed to cover the deep wheel and protect it from direct access by human and animals. The room is with the size of 2X4m. After successful construction of the deep well, it has been handed over to the community.

            Activity 3.2. Construction of latrines in 4 selected villages
            Status: 100% achieved.

            A total of 13 latrines were constructed by AHDAA. These latrines located, 5 in Sharistan, 3 in Sabz Naw, 3 in Sorkhak and 2 in Karak villages. The construction of these latrines were done by 195 unskilled workers contributed by community members and 65 skilled labours paid by AHDAA. The locations of the latrines were selected in close coordination with Shura members who were familiar with the needs. After coordination with Shura structures, they appointed the families (who are using the latrines) to take care of the latrines. In case of any small maintenance required for these latrines, Shura accepted to utilize the money from saving boxes to rehabilitate it. And finally, during CLTS training, AHDAA informed communities that these latrines are developed as models while community members themselves can use this experience and build their own one in their houses. AHDAA also shared information about more economic latrine constructions by utilizing the community level resources (wood, plastic etc…).

            Expected result 4:
            Shepherds and farmers improved their livelihood opportunities in 4 targeted communities through disease treatment and awareness raising.

             Activity 4.1: Training for shepherds and distribution of materials for animal husbandry
            Status: 100% achieved.

            Status: 100% completed veterinary of planned.
            AHDAA veterinary doctor, agronomist and Project Manager organized 2 days training for 5 shepherds in targeted communities (one from Karak, one from Sabz Naw, and one from Sharistan and 2 from Sorkhak). The training focused on the following topics:

            • Nutrition of animals
            • How to take care of their animals?
            • How to prevent their animals from diseases?
            • How to do vaccination of their animals?
            • Identification of sick animals
            • Regeneration of animals
            • How to use postures in different seasons?
            • How to strength and take care of postures

            At the end of the training, every shepherd received a training manual which was developed by AHDAA. Further follow up technical support was given by AHDAA veterinary doctor to shepherds on how to properly take care of their livestock. All 5 shepherds received animal husbandry kits (one kit per shepherd) consist of the following items:

            • Knife
            • Nail clipper
            • Thermometer
            • Needle for vaccination

            As per follow up visit of AHDAA staff from trained shepherds, they all expressed their satisfaction and said that it was a productive course for their animal husbandry work.

            Activity 4.2: Conduct training sessions for farmers on planting vegetable and animal husbandry in 4 targeted communities.
            Status: 100% achieved.
            Status: 100% completed of planned.

            On July 2017, a total of 153 farmers identified from 4 targeted communities (64 farmers from Sorkhak, 37 farmers from Sharistan, 38 farmers from Sabz Naw and 14 farmers from Karak) who received 4 days training on planting vegetable and animal husbandry. The participants were divided into groups of 16-20 people where the trainings were organized in their respected communities. The 4 days training was consist of 3 days theoretical and one-day practical course.

            The following topics were covered during these trainings:

            • What is vegetable
            • Value of vegetables for nutrition
            • Types of vegetables
            • How to prepare the land for planting the vegetables?
            • How to plant vegetables
            • Usage of chemical and natural fertilizers
            • Irrigation
            • Harvesting
            • Storing
            • Marketing
            • How to use vegetables without cooking
            • Cooking and using vegetables as food
            • How to dry and maintain vegetables for winter season
            • Method of getting vegetable seeds.
            • Treatment of vegetable seeds before planting
            • How to generate planting the vegetable seeds

             

            The comparative report of pre and post test results indicated 45% improvement to the knowledge and skills of farmers in regard to the trained topics. In addition, the entire 153 farmers who received training benefited from vegetable seeds to practically plant vegetables in their villages.
            The training was highly appreciated by the farmers where the farmers expressed their good understanding on planting vegetables which will have positive impact on their health and economic life.
            As the result of vegetable seeds that was given by AHDAA, all farmers planted the seeds in their respected lands under direct technical support of AHDAA. The trainings were conducted by AHDAA Veterinary with support of the agronomist. A standard training curriculum was used for these trainings which was developed by AHDAA over the past years. And finally, the entire 153 farmers received 4 days training on animal husbandry and livestock which was conducted by AHDAA agronomist.

            Activity 4.3:
            Distribution of improved wheat seeds plus fertilizer for 15 farmers in 4 targeted communities.
            Status: 100% achieved.

            In close coordination with Shura structures, RCDC and CRS organizations who has experience about improved wheat seeds, AHDAA identified the types of improved seeds which is more productive in targeted locations. After consultation process, AHDAA purchased the 15 packets (50kg each) of improved wheat seeds plus fertilizers. And also, during Oct 23-26, 2017 AHDAA conducted 4 days training for 15 selected farmers from 4 targeted communities ((6 from Sorkhak, 4 from Sharistan, 2 from Karak and 3 from Sabza Now). The training focused on the following topics:

            • Wheat and its value as food
            • Types of wheat
            • What is the improved wheat seed and how it is produced
            • Methods of preparing the land for planting the improved wheat seeds
            • Methods of planting and time frame over the year in accordance to Sang-Takht Bandar geographical context
            • How to use different types of fertilizers
            • Method and frequency of irrigation
            • Agriculture diseases (e.g. black rust, steam rust, uritlago triticia etc.) and how to overcome these diseases
            • Cleaning the planted lands from other types of plants
            • How to prevent the mixture of improved wheat seeds with other wheat seeds
            • How to collect the wheat
            • Methods for processing, packaging and marketing
            • Treatment of wheat seeds before planting
            • How to extend the improved wheat seeds in other locations of the communities

            The training was conducted by AHDAA agronomist and the comparison of pre and post-test result shows that the participants understood 88% of the of the training.

            Activity 4.4: Vaccination of livestock in 4 targeted villages.
            Status: 100% achieved.

            During the project period, AHDAA veterinary team vaccinated a total of 3000 sheep and 271 cows from 4 targeted communities. The vaccinations were on:

            • Foot and mouth diseases (FMD)
            • Sheep pox
            • Anthrax (PPR) for sheep, goat and cow
            • New castle
            • Gambro
            • Bronchitis for chicken and hen

            In addition, based on the needs, 3270 Albendazole (for stomach problems especially for internal parasites) distributed for people to use it for their goats, sheep and cows. And finally, 20 cows received vitamins syrups, 90 cows received powder bone for their bone diseases.

             

     

  1. Goals reached and their impactsOverall objectivesa. Comparison of specified goals with goals actually reachedThe overall objective of this project is to build resilience in 4 villages of Sang Takh-Bandar district of Daykundi province in AfghanistanThe overall goal of this project was completely achieved through establishment of sustainable DRR committees through community level resources and building the capacity of entire committee members and task force groups on DRR, WASH and conflict resolution. We believe, building the capacity of CBDRM committee members on advocacy skills will help them to attract and utilize further resources in their communities on DRR prevention and mitigation. The achievement of the proposed goal was further complimented by construction of small scale mitigation and WASH infrastructure. People in targeted communities got the opportunity for the first time in their community life to ensure the most utilization of water resources in their communities through having access to safe drinking water and irrigation. One of the key elements which ensured reaching to this goal was the active participation and contribution of wider community members toward implementation of project activities.
      1. Comparison of expected impacts with actual impacts including unintended impacts

    The following impacts have been ensured through implementation of this project in DAYKUNDI  province of Afghanistan:

     

Expected Result Expected Impact Achieved impact
Result 1): The 4 targeted communities are more avalanche, flood and drought resilient through enhanced coping mechanisms by means of establishment of CBDRM committees and task force groups as well as awareness raising at community and school levels

 

 

 

 

 

Improved coping capacity through established CBDRM committees and task force groups as well as awareness raising activities in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak villages of Saai Valley

 

The expected impact of this result has been 100% achieved through:

• Formation of 4 CBDRM committees (including male and female members in each committee) in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Krak and Sabz now under Saai valley
• Formation of one CBDRM committee in Istaqlal high school under Saai valley
• Formation of 16 Task Force groups in 4 targeted villages under Saai valley (4 groups per village)
• Training for CBDRM committees and task force groups
• Training on DRR for school’s teachers and students in 4 selected villages
• Training on DRR for CDC members in Saai valley
• Distribution of DRR materials (First aid boxes and DRR toolkits) for CBDRM and task force groups as well as teachers and students

Result 2):
The water quality and water security situation has improved at community level through WASH awareness raising activities.
Decreased water borne disease by provision of potable water in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak villages in Saai valley

Improved hygiene, sanitation condition in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak villages in Saai valley

 

The expected impact of this result has been 100% achieved through:

• Improved knowledge of wider community members on how to prevent water borne diseases in 4 selected communities.
• People improved their hygiene through using the distributed hygiene toolkits in 4 targeted communities

Result 3): The 3 targeted communities are more resilient through rehabilitation of springs, construction of water reserves, establishment of pipe schemes and 4 communities have improved sanitation levels through construction of latrines.

 

 

Providing irrigation water for 700 jarib (1 Jirib = 2000m2) lands which belong to 112 household families.

500 Jaribs in Sorkhak and 200 Jaribs in Sharistan village in Saai valley and provided irrigation water for 700 jarib lands which belong to 112 farmer household family.

Two irrigation water pool (in length of 11m, wide of 10m and height of 1m) has been rehabilitated in Sorkhak and Sharistan villages of Saai valley. A total of 112 families will get access to irrigation water through irrigation of 700 Jirib lands

13 public latrines constructed for 168 families (around 5-13 families per latrine) in 4 targeted villages of Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now, and Karak villages of Saai valley. The exact location of the latrines were selected by Shura in consultation with community members as well as in consideration of the accessible point to  the most families who are expected to use these latrines.

The expected impact of this result has been 100% achieved through:

• Rehabilitation of Springs, construction of water reservoir and Installation of pipe schemes and taps in 4 targeted villages
• Construction of 13 latrines in 4 selected villages and distribution of plastic bath.

 

 

Result 4): Shepherds and farmers improved their livelihood opportunities in 4 targeted communities through disease treatment and awareness raising.

 

Improved livelihood in 4 targeted villages and enhanced the capacity and education of farmers through training programs.

Established standard norms for animal husbandry and agriculture through training sessions.

 

 

 

The expected impact of this result has been 100% achieved through:

• Training for shepherds and distribution of materials for animal husbandry
• Conduct training sessions for farmers on agriculture and animal husbandry in 4 targeted communities.

And vaccination of livestock in 4 targeted communities.

 2.2 Contribution of results achieved and towards the reaching of the goals and the impacts stated; evaluation on the basis of the indicators defined in the project proposal

 

Expected Result Expected indicators Achievement
Result 1) The 4 targeted communities are more avalanche, flood and drought resilient through enhanced coping mechanisms by means of establishment of CBDRM committees and task force groups as well as awareness raising at community and school levels.

 

DRR Community Action Plan made in 4 targeted villages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Procedure and mechanism made for CBDRM committees and task force groups in 4 targeted committees – in Sorkhak, Sharistan, Sabza Now and Karak villages of under saii valley.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRR toolkits distributed in Sorkhak, Shahristan, Sabza Now, Karak villages and Estaqlal high school in Sia kharak market under Saii valley.

Training manuals distributed

 

 

 

 

 

 

All CBDRM and task force groups registered at District level and provincial ANDMA

 

All targeted communities developed their individual DRR contingency plan where this plan is considered as the main referent document in case of disaster event. The training activities given to CBDRM committee and task force group members help them to properly develop their contingency plan.

 

Structured procedure has been introduced for the targeted committee members to manage disaster events in different stages (pre, during and after disaster). The structure is that task force groups are directed by the CBDRM committees and regular coordination meetings organized among the committee members while the CBDRM committee is managed by the Shura structure in the community.

 

All DRR toolkits distributed in targeted communities in Estaqlal high school as planned.

All participants of the trainings received DRR manual. The post information assessment (through asking individuals) shows that the training manuals were quite useful for the target groups to refresh their studies and increase their coping mechanisms.

 

All CBDRM and task force groups officially registered at district level and ANDMA.

Result 2) The water quality and water security situation has improved at community level through WASH awareness raising activities. Construction of 5 springs for drinking water and construction one water reservoir in karak village.

One pipe scheme in total length of 2500m Installation of 10 taps in karak village.

Distribution of 336 toolkits for all components and distribution of 168 plastic bath for 4 targeted villages.

 

Training hygiene manuals 336 distributed in 4 targeted communities.

Water borne diseases decreased.

Construction of 13 public latrines in 4 targeted villages.

 

Recovery system for pipe scheme established saving box in each target village level

 Through construction of springs, people now have access to safe drinking water.

And through pipe schemes and installation of taps, water is maintained clean as well as reached to nearby location of the households.

336 hygiene toolkits and 168 plastic baths distributed.

 

 

The community health is improved.

All public latrines constructed which resulted to decrease diseases among community members (reported by the health facility and people themselves).

 

 

And finally, the cost recovery system for pipe scheme and established 4 saving boxes in targeted villages (per saving box in each community) helped people to benefit from these services in a sustainable way.

Result 3) The 4 targeted communities are more resilient through rehabilitation of springs, construction of water reserves, establishment of pipe schemes and 4 communities have improved sanitation levels through construction of latrines.

 

 

 

Construction of 5 spring, one water pool and installation of one pipe scheme in length of 3100m for irrigation water in shahristan village.

 

 

Construction of digging deep well for installation of solar pump for providing irrigation water in Sorkhak village.

Two communities livelihood insure will be improved.

 

Construction of 13 public latrines.

 

 

 

 

 

Sanitation in 4 targeted communities improved.

Recovery system for pipe scheme, solar water pump established saving box in each target village level.

And through pipe schemes and construction of one water pool, the community of this village access for irrigation water and they cultivated of 700 jerib of agriculture lands.

 

 

And through of digging deep well in installation of solar pump, the community of this village access for irrigation water. they cultivated 800 jerib of agriculture lands.

 

 

All public latrines constructed which resulted to decrease diseases among community members (reported by the health facility and people themselves).

The communities access to standard public latrines.

And finally, the cost recovery system for pipe scheme helped people to benefit from these services in a sustainable way.

Result 4) Shepherds and farmers improved their livelihood opportunities in 4 targeted communities through disease treatment and awareness raising. Conducted Animal husbandry training and animal husbandry manuals distributed awareness increased.

 

Animal husbandry toolkits distributed in Sorkhak, Shahristan, Sabza Now and Karak villages under Saii valley.

Veterinary services was done in 4 targeted villages.

 

 

Conducted agriculture training and distribution of improved wheat seed and vegetable seeds manuals.

 

Improved wheat seeds, Vegetable seeds and fertilizers distributed in 4 targeted villages under Sai valley.

 

 

Improved livelihood formers and shepherds.

 

 

 

The communities received animal husbandry trainings. They accessed for animal husbandry manuals.

 

 

The shepherds accessed for animal husbandry toolkits. They can do small veterinary services in their communities.

The communities accessed to vaccinated of their animals in 4 targeted villages.

 

The communities received agriculture trainings. They accessed for agriculture manuals.

 

 

The formers in 4 targeted villages accessed for improved wheat seed, vegetables seeds and fertilizers. They able to cultivated of their lands.

 

The communities improved of resilience in livelihood.

 

 

According to expected impact all the target beneficiaries benefited from the project. In this case we 100 % of the project’s objective has been achieved.

2. Analysis of Project Experiences
a. Relevance of project activities, results achieved and impacts stated for the target groups and, if applicable, also for the project environment; evaluation on the basis of the target groups defined in the project proposal.

Target beneficiary Impact
Families (wider community members) –          Wider community members understood the importance of DRR management in their communities and ensured their full support to mitigate the risks.

–          Wider community members understood the importance of hygiene/sanitation and started practicing hygiene promotion in their life which helped them to improve their health condition.

–          They got access to safe drinking water in nearby to their houses. In addition, women are not anymore traveling long distances to collect drinking water.

–          Through protection of water resources at community level (through small scale mitigation) people experience better livelihood opportunities. 64% of the agriculture products will be increased.

–          As the result of rehabilitation of springs, between 41-82% of the water resources increased in the communities.

–          Trough Rehabilitation of irrigation system and construction pipe scheme, reservoir and taps 5 families returned back in karak village.

I am happy to be back to my community and have access to irrigation and drinking water which helps my life and thus I enjoy my life with my family and relatives. Thanks AHDAA and DKH for your support (Quoted from Hossain Ali who is return to his village)

CBDRM committee members and task force group members. –          The CBDRM committee members are aware on the importance of DRR management in their communities and are able to maintain this structure for the future.

–          Through training activities, the CBDRM committee members have the knowledge and skills on how to cope disaster events.

–           The members understand how to maintain their community structures to prevent it from disasters as well as they also expressed that they will not construct their infrastructures in hazard areas.

School teachers and students –          Students are aware on how to act in case of disaster events.

–          School students and teachers expressed that they understood how to develop hazard map in their communities which should mitigate disaster risks in the future.

–          Through DRR kits in school, children are now using tent as class where they were under sun and dust before which has positive impact to their health.

CDC members in Sang Takht Bandar District –          CDC members in Sang Takht Bandar District expressed that they understand the importance of DRR management and they said they will fully support the Communities to mitigate DRR events.
Shepherds and Farmers

 

 

 

 

 

 

–          Shepherds and farmers increased knowledge on agriculture and animal husbandry.

–          Through animal husbandry kits, shepherds able to using on animal veterinary services.

–          Through distribution of vegetable seeds, improved wheat seeds, fertilizers and Agriculture diseases decreased. Agriculture crops increased.

–          Access for vegetable seeds and improve livelihood in 4 targeted communities.

–          Through vaccination decreased 90% animal diseases in 4 targeted villages.

–          Through agriculture, animal husbandry and veterinary services improved the livelihood households families in 4 communities.

b. Assessment of experiences made in the cooperation with the target groups during the entire project period, including planning phase
During project development phase, the team of AHDAA ensured active and full participation of relevant community members (Shura members, head of households, women, CBDRM committee members, young and other key community members) in Sorkhak, Sharestan, Sabza now and Karak villages under saai valley – Sang Takht Bandar district. Through participatory approach, the following aspect of the project development has been ensured:

  • The project was fully designed based on community’s defined priorities expressed by the key community members (Shura members, head of households, women, CBDRM committee members, young and other key community members) during the risk/needs assessment and household survey that was conducted during implementation phases.
  • The project answers to the main needs of the community members through their practical involvement during identification of the project (joining the risk/needs assessment process) and implementation process of the project (through sharing their human resources and monitoring the activities).
  • Community participation and role (to share free daily labour and take part in monitoring the work) was clearly defined by Project Manager during project development phase

An opportunity (through their practical involvement in all stages of the project) was given for the community members to identify their capabilities in managing disaster incidents and thus, through practical involvement of the community members during design of the project (joined the risk/needs assessment, expressed their needs and shared their priorities).

the following cooperation of community members has been granted during the implementation phase:

  • Community members ensured their full participation during project implementation period through sharing free unskilled labours to do construction activities and monitor the project activities.
  • Community members, fully supported (through sharing information about any risk and guiding the AHDAA team to take the right pathways for their movement) the security management of this project
  • Community members granted their financial contribution toward quality implementation of the project activities ex. They have provided in kind support through facilitation of unskilled labour for construction activities as well as rehabilitation of 1 km road with the value of 14,16,500 AFS.

And finally, it is worth to mention that the project activities would not have been possible to be implemented in such quality without community participation thus, their cooperation ensured quality project implementation as well as continuation on management and maintenance of the established structures when AHDAA withdraw. Community participation helped AHDAA to (1) Design a relevant project adjusted to the community needs and in line with community priorities expressed by the community members (2) Ensure cost efficiency of the project through utilization of community resources (free daily labours) and also utilizing skilled workers with minimum cost (3) Ensured people’s participation in monitoring process of the project where people had the chance to express their views on changing the work in an adaptive way to the community’s context and needs (4) Assessment of experiences made in project management as well as in the cooperation and consultation with other organizations and relevant actors

AHDAA internal level:
AHDAA has been implementing DRR and WASH activities over the past 10 years which helped the organization to produce practical tools, procedures and guidelines for development and implementation of DRR projects. Our work in Daykundi  for the past 2 years were a valuable learning opportunity for AHDAA to design relevant project for 2017. All those experiences were utilize to properly engage with DRR intervention in Sang Takht Bandar district of Daykundi .

Stakeholder’s level:
During the project implementation period, AHDAA ensured its close co-operation with relevant stakeholders in Herat and Daykundi (Through participation in different coordination meetings and also conducting individual coordination meetings with key project stakeholders) to ensure utilization (Ex. Conducted meeting with CRS and RCDC organizations) of different experiences done in this field by other organizations. AHDAA actively participated in different coordination forums in Herat and Daykundi  province which was an opportunity to understand on different developments made by relevant organizations and it was quite helpful to define its activities accordingly and to avoid any duplication of activities. In fact, participation of AHDAA at Herat level coordination forums were not directly part of the project but in order for AHDAA team to be aware of the overall development context, AHDAA participated to different coordination meetings (WASH, FSAC, protection, People with Special Needs etc..). These meetings even at Herat level, were helping a better project management in Daykundi  province through experience sharing, learning and utilizing tools.

At community level:
AHDAA maintained its close coordination with community led structures (through meetings, collecting their thoughts about the project, involving people in decision making process for defining the project activities and also involvement of people in monitoring process of the project as well as assuring their contribution in project implementation i.e. people’s participation in construction activities as free daily labours) in order to ensure their active participation for project implementation. The coordination matters were quite interesting and useful where community members trusted on the work that AHDAA does. Although people initially did not believe at the work of the project due their experiences that they had with other organizations (many projects implemented with no result) but after they found that the project is decided by themselves, they raised their interest toward its implementation and monitoring. The community led structures were quite helpful toward implementation and sustainability of the project (through saving box and taking responsibility to maintain the work that were initiated by AHDAA) as well as they continuously supported the security aspect of AHDAA’s team to minimize the risk. We would highly take the coordination matter as a great learning for future projects where we ensured full participation of community members in different steps of the project (i.e. design, implementation, monitoring and contribution).

c. Description and assessment of dealing with risks in relation to implementation and reaching of goals

No specific risks occurred to have impact on the project implementation

Conclusions of consequences for future work are to be mentioned as well.
The project was implemented quite successfully where all the expected objectives have been achieved. After 2 years of work in Daykundi , we realized the people from non-targeted communities are starting to think about DRR management in their communities (ex. Thinking of hazards while building new houses, constructed some latrines in their villages without AHDAA support) and thus, our success was not only in the targeted communities but we helped promotion of DRR intervention to wider geographical coverage that what we covered through these projects.
Community participation was highly ensured (through sharing free labour workers and monitoring the activities) and the entire DRR led structures were developed from the pool of key community members who shown high commitment for DRR intervention. This unique situation will ensure sustainability of the action as people are taking the lead for their own community development.
Through participatory approach of AHDAA toward project implementation and ensuring transparency of the work done by AHDAA, high level of community and governmental trust was ensured toward AHDAA activities which helped protection and security of the staff who worked for the project.

And finally, the work of AHDAA and DKH was appreciated by Daykundi  governor, economic directorate, agriculture directorate and district governor in Sang Takht Bandar who requested AHDAA and DKH for continuation of such work in the future.

Success stories:
Please see annex 2 for success stories

End of report

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